Another Home Assistant Update

Yesterday, after moving my GitLab instance, I noticed that the public clone of my Home Assistant configurations was a bit stale, so I decided that it was time to refresh.

In so doing, I also discovered that I was a few releases behind (three, to be exact), and that those intervening releases included several breaking changes. Fortunately, updating my configurations to support Home Assistant 0.57.3 also resolved several longstanding bugs. 🎉

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GitLab on the move again

After a few successful months of testing Packet.net, I've once again moved git.ethitter.com. The decision was purely financial–my GitLab instance doesn't receive enough traffic to warrant Packet.net's pricing. As far as reliability and value were concerned, Packet.net was excellent. I would've appreciated built-in backups, but otherwise, I have no complaints about the service.

It will likely come as little surprise that git.ethitter.com is back on Linode. Compared to Digital Ocean, Linode is slightly more-generous with its resources, and GitLab wants all the resources it can get.

The migration itself was quite easy, with most of the time was spent preparing the server; GitLab's backup/restore process did most of the hard work. Now I just have to finish the ancillary setup, like monitoring.

Moving on from Automattic

Friday was my last day at Automattic. Leaving was one of the more-difficult decisions I’ve ever made, but I was ready for a new challenge; regardless, I never thought this day would come. I will dearly miss my former colleagues, and it will take some time to adjust to not being an Automattician.

Since I made my announcement, the question has been, “What’s next?”

Well, I’m beyond excited to announce that I joined Alley Interactive as a Principal Software Developer. Being a VIP Featured Partner, I’ve reviewed and appreciated Alley’s work from Automattic’s side for some time; I’ve also known several of their staff for a few years, and working with them seemed a natural fit.

Not being one to rest, I started at Alley yesterday. 🎉

Impatiently updating my Nexus 6

My well-documented impatience extends to my mobile device, an unlocked Nexus 6 on Verizon. While I generally received Google’s updates in short order, this was not always the case. To my relief, Google releases the same updates carriers deliver to their subscribers, allowing me to update my device at my convenience.
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Managing domain and certificate expiration with DomainMOD

With 40 domains–plus a half dozen certificates–to track, I added the DomainMOD tool to my repertoire. Its API integrations, in particular, made it an appealing choice, as I had little desire to manually enter so many details. After three months, I’m quite pleased with my decision.

Installation was as straightforward as a git checkout, creation of a MySQL table, and the addition of a server block to my nginx configuration. With DomainMOD successfully running, I configured it to use my mailserver, then got to importing my domains.

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Abandoning StartSSL

After Mozilla’s devastating report, and both Chrome and Firefox’s decision to stop trusting StartSSL certificates issued after October 28, I had no choice but to replace the certificates I’d obtained through StartSSL.

The process took a few months, mainly due to the associated costs. While most of my StartSSL certificates were replaced with ones issued by Let’s Encrypt, there were a few cases where LE wasn’t appropriate. This primarily impacted domains that have many, many subdomains, however there were also a few cases where Let’s Encrypt’s three-month duration would’ve been burdensome. Ultimately I had to purchase three wildcard certificates, plus three single-domain certificates. With those installed, I’m now free of StartSSL/Wosign. After sixty days, I can rotate the pinned keys, impeding any further use of my legacy StartSSL certificates.