Talks

WP_Rewrite Isn’t As Scary As You Think–WordCamp Vancouver 2013

I just finished my presentation at WordCamp Vancouver 2013 entitled “WP_Rewrite Isn’t As Scary As You Think.” My intent was to reduce the fear surrounding WP_Rewrite in the hope that more developers will be able to leverage the API in their code. I described my talk thusly:

Everyone wants pretty URLs on their sites, and WordPress provides a powerful system to support this. Behind the magic of the Permalinks settings page is WP_Rewrite, an API terrifying to many developers.

Like most of WordPress, the Rewrites system isn’t limited just to internal use, and understanding how the API works lets developers build powerful tools atop the platform. We’ll start by discussing what happens when you set a permalink structure through the dashboard and how WordPress uses that to query for content. We’ll then explore how you can add custom rewrite rules, both with and without an understanding of regular expressions. By the end of this session, you’ll know what actions and filters are available to tweak rewrite rules, how endpoints enhance your code, and how you can leverage this powerful API to deliver a better user experience.

Proposed as a 45-minute presentation, I was offered a shorter slot instead. As such, the talk isn’t as in-depth as I described it, but it still provides a good primer for those unfamiliar with WP_Rewrite.

Slides from the talk are available at http://slides.ethitter.com/wp-rewrite-isnt-scary/. I’ll embed the video as soon as it’s available.

Year in Review

I experienced two notable milestones last week. It’s been a year since I joined Automattic, and I’ve been without a permanent home for the same duration. During this year, I’ve visited a new country, met innumerable incredible people from both Automattic and the WordPress community, attended fourteen (14!) WordCamps and spoken at seven (7!), and taken over as lead of Team Custom. I’ve flown in excess of 100,000 miles and spent at least seven months away from my Boston-area home base.

What a great experience I’ve had and a wild year it’s been! I have no desire or intent to settle down any time soon, and going forward, will be posting more about my nomadic experience  at Get Transient along with Siobhan McKeown,  Hanni Ross, and guests.

The Power of WordPress’ Roles and Capabilities–Portland WordPress Meetup

At tonight’s Portland WordPress meetup, I’ll present a combined version of my two talks on WordPress’ Roles and Capabilities system. I’ve given these talks before, most recently at WordCamp Toronto 2012 and WordCamp Toronto Developers 2012.

So those in attendance can follow along, below are the slides I’ll use as part of the discussion:

My appearance at PDXWP was described as follows:

WordPress’ roles seem simple enough on the surface, but behind the Administrator, Editor, and the other default roles is a powerful system that can be customized extensively. For April’s PDXWP Developer’s meetup, Erick Hitter, Lead of Team Custom at Automattic, is joining us to talk about WordPress roles and capabilities.

While some have said that other CMS’ have an advantage when it comes to security and customizing capabilities, Erick will demonstrate that that isn’t true. Starting with a walkthrough of how to modify existing roles and create new ones, he will then cover how to leverage custom roles in WordPress code. Finally, he will wrap up with a discussion of some powerful filters that will prove WordPress has a roles and capabilities system that is as flexible as the popular competitors often touted as having superior implementations.

Lastly, here’s the recording:

From URL to Query–WordCamp Miami 2013

Today at WordCamp Miami, I reprised my latest talk, From URL to Query. I’ve now given this talk at WordCamps Phoenix, Atlanta, and Miami; the latter two presentations are an expanded version of the original talk delivered in Phoenix.

Briefly, this was the intent of my talk:

Ever wonder what process WordPress undertakes when someone visits your site? Or how it translates that nice permalink to the database query that ultimately delivers the content your visitors requested? Or what it takes to load the appropriate template from your site’s theme?

In this talk, I’ll walk through WordPress’ loading process and shed some light on the various APIs used. I’ll also discuss how these APIs work together to make the software function.

Slides are available at http://slides.ethitter.com/from-url-to-query/.

I’ll link to the video once it becomes available. The recording of the WordCamp Phoenix iteration is available in the meantime, but isn’t as in-depth as what I covered in Atlanta or Miami.

From URL to Query–WordCamp Atlanta 2013

Today at WordCamp Atlanta, I reprised my latest talk, From URL to Query. This was an expanded version of the content I delivered at WordCamp Phoenix in January. Briefly, this was the intent of my talk:

Ever wonder what process WordPress undertakes when someone visits your site? Or how it translates that nice permalink to the database query that ultimately delivers the content your visitors requested? Or what it takes to load the appropriate template from your site’s theme?

In this talk, I’ll walk through WordPress’ loading process and shed some light on the various APIs used. I’ll also discuss how these APIs work together to make the software function.

Slides are available at http://slides.ethitter.com/from-url-to-query/.

I’ll link to the video once it becomes available. The recording of the WordCamp Phoenix iteration is available in the meantime, but isn’t as in-depth as what I covered in Atlanta.

From URL to Query–WordCamp Phoenix 2013

Today at WordCamp Phoenix, I presented my newest talk, From URL to Query. Briefly, this was the intent of my talk:

Ever wonder what process WordPress undertakes when someone visits your site? Or how it translates that nice permalink to the database query that ultimately delivers the content your visitors requested? Or what it takes to load the appropriate template from your site’s theme?

In this talk, I’ll walk through WordPress’ loading process and shed some light on the various APIs used. I’ll also discuss how these APIs work together to make the software function.

Slides are available at http://slides.ethitter.com/wcphx-from-url-to-query/.

WordCamp Phoenix 2013: WP401

Yesterday, Paul Clark (@pdclark, pdclark.com) and I ran WordCamp Phoenix 2013′s WP401 session. We covered everything from object-oriented plugin development to CSS preprocessors to WordPress’ rewrite system.

The session was recorded, so video should eventually be available on WordPress.tv.

In the meantime, slides for those topics I prepared them for are available:

Thanks to all who attended! It was a great day, due in no small part to the great audience we had. It was a pleasure to work with Paul on this as well!

The Power of WordPress’ Roles and Capabilities: Understanding map_meta_cap–WordCamp Toronto Developers 2012

Today I delivered a followup talk to The Power of WordPress’ Roles and Capabilities that delves into the map_meta_cap filter. This presentation is intended for developers who need greater control over permissions than roles alone provide.

Here’s the abstract:

In the second installment of this talk, I’ll discuss the true power behind WordPress’ roles and capabilities system, map_meta_cap. Starting with an overview of how it relates to the system as a whole, including the functions discussed in the first installment, this talk will then use real-world examples to demonstrate how the map_meta_cap function and filter can be properly used to fully leverage WordPress’ capabilities system. For anyone who’s ever needed to conditionally grant or deny a user or group of users a certain ability, or wondered what the map_meta_cap flag in register_post_type() does, this talk will provide the answers.

Slides are available here.

All You Ever Wanted to Know About Automattic

Hurricane Sandy disrupted life along much of the east coast, but couldn’t stop the Boston WordPress meetup. We couldn’t meet in person, so we used a Google Hangout instead. I spoke for around 90 minutes about all things Automattic.

Here’s the video:

And the slides: